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Police state - Public can no longer film the police. - Sarah's Blog — LiveJournal [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
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Police state - Public can no longer film the police. [Feb. 20th, 2009|08:03 pm]
Sarah


A video of a cop shoving a cyclist - he might get up to 4 years in prison for falsifying evidence.
A good job there was a member of the public videoing him!

http://planetsave.com/blog/2009/02/20/cop-who-shoved-cyclist-fired-by-nypd-faces-4-year-sentence/


But wait - that's illegal in the UK.
We can't film the police anymore, so that above situation if it happened now in the UK?
The cyclist would be going to prison.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/feb/16/protest-police-liberty-central



I can't wait for the first news report of people getting arrested for photographing the police.
How long do you think it will be?
linkReply

Comments:
[User Picture]From: wingless_kitty
2009-02-20 08:34 pm (UTC)
That depends... the news reporters might be threatened with beatings and jail time too.
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[User Picture]From: joycegirl
2009-02-20 10:13 pm (UTC)
It is much too Orwellian for me.

How sad, that these things have come to pass :(
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: katsmeat
2009-02-21 01:34 am (UTC)
A thing to remember is that the law is directed against people taking pictures to further terrorism. That'll be unprovable in most cases, especially if the pictures in question were, for example, of police roughing up protestors at a demo and taken by a photographer with no associations with violent extremist groups. Remember, the CPS decides withere to prosecute, not the police. Since the government gave the CPS performance targets to reach, they now hate launching prosecutions without an excellent chance of winning. So the chances of actually being convicted for this are about nill.

Of course, this wont stop police harrassing and arresting photographers taking pictures that may show them in a bad light. Or anybody with a camera they don't like the look of. But what's new about that? It's just been made easier for them, that's all.

I suspect the law will lead to press photographers looking at spy-type concelable cameras. Earlier, I saw on the Maplins website, they do micro cameras that are concealed in a baseball cap. I'm sure there're plenty of other kinds.
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: bigby2k
2009-02-21 04:28 am (UTC)
Probably in the next five minutes.

Time to step up the resistance!
(Reply) (Thread)